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An Ebola Update from Dr. Anthony Fauci

Dr. Anthony Fauci, infectious disease chief at the National Institutes of Health (NIH), explains how Ebola spreads and what we’re doing to address it in the U.S. and in West Africa.

FAQs
In response to frequently asked questions about Ebola, here's what our public health officials are saying.
Q: What is Ebola, and what are the symptoms?
A: Ebola virus is the cause of a Ebola virus disease. Symptoms include:

Fever
Headache
Joint and muscle aches
Weakness
Diarrhea
Vomiting
Stomach pain
Lack of appetite
Abnormal bleeding
Symptoms may appear anywhere from 2 to 21 days after exposure to Ebola virus though 8-10 days is most common.

Q: How is Ebola transmitted?
A: Ebola is transmitted through direct contact with the blood or body fluids (urine, saliva, sweat, feces, vomit, breast milk, and semen) of an infected symptomatic person or though exposure to objects (such as needles) that have been contaminated with infected secretions.

Q: Can I get Ebola from a person who is infected but doesn’t have any symptoms?
A: No. Individuals who are not symptomatic are not contagious. In order for the virus to be transmitted, an individual would have to have direct contact with an individual who is experiencing symptoms or has died of the disease.

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